Photographs are an important part of the travel experience and, with so many budding photographers in this community, I wanted to create a semi-ongoing series about travel photography. Since I’m not a photographer, I’ve invited professional photographer Laurence Norah of Finding the Universe (and teacher of our Superstar Blogging photography class) to share his wisdom. In this post, Laurence will discuss how to pick the best camera (for any budget) for your travels.

Getting great photos from our travel adventures is something all of us want, and I know that when I started my life of full-time travel, deciding what kind of camera to take with me was a big decision.

In the end, I went with a bulky digital SLR (from the Canon Rebel line), and I’m pleased I did so, because it led me to becoming a full-time professional travel photographer. In my case, the investment cost and extra weight were the right decision for me — there was no such thing as mirrorless when I started out!

However, my choice certainly won’t be right for everyone. There’s a wide range of devices on the market that can take photos — everything from smartphones and point-and-shoots to mirrorless cameras and those big, heavy DSLRs. You have to decide which is right for you.

In this post, we’re going to help you do just that. And all you have to do is answer three questions.

How much money do you want to spend?

Your budget is a key part of choosing the right camera for travel. There’s no point dreaming about a high-end camera if you only have a couple of hundred dollars to spend.

Budget is a personal consideration, but there are a few things to remember that folks sometimes forget:

First, the accessories. When you buy a camera, you’re going to want to pick up a high-capacity memory card ($20–40), a case or bag ($10–200), a spare battery ($10–50), and maybe filters or a tripod. If you buy an interchangeable lens camera, think about the cost of any extra lenses as well.

Second, remember that travel can sometimes be risky. Things can be lost or stolen, and you need to think about what value of equipment you’re comfortable having with you. It’s also worth checking what your travel insurance will cover — most policies have relatively low single-item limits, so for high value equipment, you might have to consider specialty insurance.

Welcome to the latest post in our Africa column by Natasha and Cameron from The World Pursuit. While I’ve been to the continent in the past, I’ve only seen a few countries so I’m super duper excited to have these two travelers share their knowledge about traveling the continent. This month they are sharing how to travel around Namibia, one of my top five countries in the world, on a budget!

As steam rose from the tarmac and mirages presented themselves in the far distance, our truck’s engine nearly boiled over. We drove through empty Namib Desert in 40°C (104°F) heat with the windows down and heat on full blast to cool it off. Traveling around a sparsely populated desert country in Africa presents its challenges!

Despite our desert adventures, we loved traveling around Namibia and think it’s a great African destination to explore, especially for first-time travelers to the continent. We saw the sun rise over the largest sand dunes in the world in Sossusvlei and listened to thousands of seals give birth at the Cape Cross Seal Colony. Just driving around the country without seeing a single other person for hours made us feel as if we were on another planet.

Namibia is a special place that many in the world have never even heard of. Compared to South Africa, it’s a lot less visited by tourists, especially those traveling on their own and not on a tour. But we found the country easy to visit and affordable.

How much does it cost to travel around Namibia?

Namibia is one of the cheapest countries in Africa. It uses the Namibian dollar (NAD), which is 1:1 with the South African rand, and all prices are about on par with South Africa . Depending on your chosen method of transport and accommodation preference, Namibia can easily be done on a budget.

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