Fresh-baked breads. Never-ending eggs. Extravagant pastry towers. Who doesn’t love a sumptuous hotel breakfast? Certainly not Christina Ohly. The hotel-hopper extraordinaire put together a list of spreads worth traveling for, which include a few recommendations from Team Fathom. (We couldn’t help it. We’re equally obsessed.)

Everyone knows that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, something that rings true and clear during a hotel stay. My daughter Kate, who doubles as my intrepid travel companion, has pointed out on numerous occasions that a fine breakfast spread — and it doesn’t have to be fancy, just delicious, beautiful, and even quirky — is often worth planning an entire trip around. With that in mind, here are a few of our most memorable morning meals.

La Scelta di Goethe

What’s to love: The small all-suite hotel — which is really more like a sumptuous private apartment — offers the most spectacular spread of cheeses, salami, muesli, fruit tarts, and freshly baked breads on its expansive private terrace. No one but you, with your deliciously strong pot of coffee, will be overlooking Villa Borghese, endless cupolas, and Vatican City in the distance. The peel of church bells and seagulls standing sentry adds to the lovely, very local vibe.

La Mamounia

What’s to love: Start with the service. You’ll never find kinder people offering fresh juices, strong coffee, and Moroccan mint tea infusions, all in a poolside pavilion setting with lush garden views. The breakfast spread is magnificent and very authentic. Local specialties including khobz (flatbread) with olive oil and jam, sweet rolls studded with anise and sesame seeds, a version of pancakes, as well as meats, cheeses, and all kinds of eggs cooked to order.

Hoshinoya Tokyo

What’s to love: Quite possibly one of the best room service breakfasts in existence can be experienced at this new ryokan-style hotel. A beautiful wooden box is brough to your suite by a kimono-clad attendant who carefully explains each small plate. Even though it will be hard to follow most of what she says, and even though you might never know what you’re really eating, you’ll be delighted by each and every bite.

The Ritz-Carlton Kapalua

What’s to love: Fuel-up for a day of biking down the side of a volcano with a buffet extravaganza that includes all kinds of island specialties: POG (papaya, orange, and guava) juice, Portuguese sweet bread, and a seed bar — chia, flax, poppy, sesame — more comprehensive than the Whole Foods bulk bin isle. Fresh tofu, steamed rice, and a full salad bar add savory, healthy touches.

There is something incredibly relaxing about a warm bath, and these homemade salt bath bombs take the relaxation up a notch!

Bath bombs have skyrocketed in popularity lately with thousands of options available (though I’d only recommend natural options like these). Kids an adults love them and while they can cost up to $9 each to buy, you can make a whole batch for just a couple of dollars!

Bath Bombs- Natural DIY Version

Homemade Salt Bath Bombs RecipeWhen I was younger, I loved bath bombs, but avoided them as I’ve gotten older because store bought versions typically contain artificial ingredients such as dyes and fragrances.

These homemade bath fizzies are a great solution! Made from nourishing sea salt or epsom salts, alkalizing baking soda and fizzing citric acid with a nourishing oil and vanilla base.

These can be packaged for a great gift or made countless ways for relaxing baths anytime!

A Great DIY Project for Kids

Some DIY beauty recipes (especially homemade soap) require precise measuring and handling harsh chemicals such as lye, so they aren’t a great to do with children around. These bath bombs are completely opposite and are an amazing project to undertake with kids.

They are simple to make with kid-safe ingredients and are completely versatile. Let the kids think of ways to mix up the scents, colors, and other customizations.

Ingredients You’ll Need…

Bath bombs only take seconds to make, so it is important to have the ingredients on hand and measured before you start. Most of the ingredients are pantry staples in many homes, but make sure you have these on hand:

Baking Soda

The backbone of this recipe is alkalizing baking soda. It is a necessary complement to the acidic citric acid and part of the fizzing reaction. I order food-grade aluminum free baking soda from here.

Citric Acid

The more obscure ingredient in this recipe that a lot of people don’t have on hand is citric acid. It is necessary for the fizzing reaction that makes bath bombs feel like bathing in champagne. I order natural citric acid by the pound from here.

Corn Starch or Arrowroot

Corn starch provides the silky feel that we all love from bath bombs. I usually use organic corn starch powder in this recipe. Arrowroot also works but doesn’t provide quite as silky of a finished product.

If your idea of paradise is finding an out-of-the-way bakery serving outrageous pastries or eating a homemade lunch you can’t pronounce in a no-frills canteen, take time to peruse the archives of Culinary Backstreets, a terrific website offering recommendations for real-deal delicacies in far-off places. Co-founder Yigal Schleifer shares a handful of gastronomic gems found around his old stomping grounds of Istanbul.

ISTANBUL, Turkey – Istanbul sinks its magical claws into you and won’t let go in a way that few other cities do. I lived there for eight years between 2002 and 2010, but there really isn’t such a thing as leaving Istanbul. The city keeps calling me back, especially its old-school food spots and the people running them. The city’s history and humble nobility sustain Istanbul through its sizable ups and downs. When I touch down in Istanbul, these are the places I make a beeline for.

Kaymak, clotted cream made from buffalo milk, is probably the most blissfully delicious Turkish creation, the kind of thing that will eternally haunt your food memory dreams. It does mine. This spot is one of the last traditional kaymak purveyors in Istanbul, serving it with a drizzle of honey and a side of crusty fresh bread. Stepping through the doors here feels like stepping back in time.

A Turkish version of a greasy-spoon diner, this cozy place specializes in all things fowl, from chicken soup to a variety of egg dishes and even a dessert that weds a thick, milky pudding with almost microscopic strands of poached and shredded breast, served with a sprinkle of cinnamon on top. The eggs — scrambled with tomatoes and peppers (AKA menemen) or fried with your choice of different cured meats, are uniformly outstanding. But it’s their soul comforting tavuk göğsü, the chicken pudding, that remains a revelation every time I taste it.

It may no longer be a hidden treasure — the founder has been profiled in the New Yorker and René Redzepi, and other celebrity chefs have sung its praises — but no matter, there are few other restaurants like Çiya in this world. Owner/chef Musa Dağdeviren’s vision — to document and serve traditional Turkish regional recipes before they disappear — is both compelling and lovingly executed. Come here in spring, when the cooks do wicked things with bracingly tart early fruits, adding them to savory stews or grilling them with kebabs.

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