There is something incredibly relaxing about a warm bath, and these homemade salt bath bombs take the relaxation up a notch!

Bath bombs have skyrocketed in popularity lately with thousands of options available (though I’d only recommend natural options like these). Kids an adults love them and while they can cost up to $9 each to buy, you can make a whole batch for just a couple of dollars!

Bath Bombs- Natural DIY Version

Homemade Salt Bath Bombs RecipeWhen I was younger, I loved bath bombs, but avoided them as I’ve gotten older because store bought versions typically contain artificial ingredients such as dyes and fragrances.

These homemade bath fizzies are a great solution! Made from nourishing sea salt or epsom salts, alkalizing baking soda and fizzing citric acid with a nourishing oil and vanilla base.

These can be packaged for a great gift or made countless ways for relaxing baths anytime!

A Great DIY Project for Kids

Some DIY beauty recipes (especially homemade soap) require precise measuring and handling harsh chemicals such as lye, so they aren’t a great to do with children around. These bath bombs are completely opposite and are an amazing project to undertake with kids.

They are simple to make with kid-safe ingredients and are completely versatile. Let the kids think of ways to mix up the scents, colors, and other customizations.

Ingredients You’ll Need…

Bath bombs only take seconds to make, so it is important to have the ingredients on hand and measured before you start. Most of the ingredients are pantry staples in many homes, but make sure you have these on hand:

Baking Soda

The backbone of this recipe is alkalizing baking soda. It is a necessary complement to the acidic citric acid and part of the fizzing reaction. I order food-grade aluminum free baking soda from here.

Citric Acid

The more obscure ingredient in this recipe that a lot of people don’t have on hand is citric acid. It is necessary for the fizzing reaction that makes bath bombs feel like bathing in champagne. I order natural citric acid by the pound from here.

Corn Starch or Arrowroot

Corn starch provides the silky feel that we all love from bath bombs. I usually use organic corn starch powder in this recipe. Arrowroot also works but doesn’t provide quite as silky of a finished product.

I may not eat grains (that much), but they still have their uses. This oatmeal lavender facial scrub recipe helps to soothe and calm skin while gently helping to exfoliate it. It can be a good solution for those with sensitive skin, but it’s also useful for all skin types!

Facial Scrub Ingredients (And Why They’re Used)

These are the basic ingredients that I use in this scrub. If you aren’t into the DIY but want an amazing natural facial cleansing scrub, I love this handmade one from Crunchy Betty and use it when I don’t feel like making it myself.

Oatmeal

While you won’t typically see a bowl of rolled oats at my breakfast table, oatmeal is a cheap and natural way to care for the skin. People have been using oats for skincare for about 4,000 years. When the oats are finely ground they form what’s called colloidal oatmeal.

The New Zealand Dermatological Society lists the many proven benefits of oatmeal for skin:

forms a barrier to protect skin against irritants and balance normal skin pH
moisturizes skin with water-binding polysaccharides, hydrocolloids, and fats
soothes itchy, dry skin with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties
guards against photoaging (sun damage)
lowers prostaglandin production and arachidonic acid release
It’s no wonder colloidal oatmeal is in so many skin products!

Lavender

Lavender is one of my absolute favorite herbs, and I’ve detailed more about it here. This facial scrub recipe uses both lavender flowers and lavender essential oil, which both help calm and heal the skin. The flowers add extra exfoliation while the lavender essential oil adds concentrated beneficial properties … not to mention both smell amazing!

Baking Soda and Sea Salt

Lavender and oatmeal are very gentle, but I’ve added a little baking soda and sea salt help to up the scrubbing power.

Baking soda is a very fine powder, so it acts like a microdermabrasion to gently exfoliate the skin. Sea salt is a little coarser but only a small amount is used overall so as not to overpower the other ingredients in this facial scrub recipe. Himalayan sea salt is my favorite to use as it nourishes the skin with a wide variety of minerals.

Gentle Oatmeal Lavender Facial Scrub Recipe

This is one of my new favorite beauty recipes, and I think you’re going to love it as well!

I’m a big fan of the oil cleansing method, and I’ve even been known to rub raw honey on my face. For those who are looking for a more traditional soap-based way to cleanse skin, I’ve been experimenting with this foaming face wash recipe. It has a rich lather and benefits every skin type.

This recipe is very similar to my foaming hand soap with a little added boost of skin nourishment from various hydrosols. While you can use distilled water as a more frugal option, hydrosols have a much longer shelf life than water and have extra benefits.

Hydrosols in Foaming Face Wash

Hydrosols are the by-product of essential oil production. While essential oils are highly concentrated, hydrosols are very gentle, but with many of the same properties.

One big difference to note: hydrosols are water soluble and essential oils are not. This makes mixing easier and takes away some of the worries about using essential oils safely.

Depending on how it’s made and what preservatives are used, hydrosols will typically last 12-18 months. This is a benefit to homemade skincare products sine they typically don’t contain preservatives and can spoil earlier than shelf-stable commercial products.

How to Choose a Hydrosol by Skin Type

Witch hazel hydrosol – This is different from the witch hazel found in most stores which contains alcohol. It’s an astringent and cleansing, making it good for oily and acne-prone skin.
Rose hydrosol – This hydrosol is soothing and nourishing for all skin types, but it’s especially good for mature skin. Rose is hydrating and a humectant to lock in moisture.
Chamomile hydrosol – Very calming to irritated skin. Chamomile hydrosol improves skin elasticity and is antiseptic, and antibacterial.
Cucumber hydrosol – Useful for all skin types, this hydrosol cools and calms inflamed skin. It’s also very hydrating.
Clary sage hydrosol– This is a more potent-smelling hydrosol, but it’s known to smooth and calm skin. It’s also slightly astringent so it’s perfect for oily skin.
Geranium hydrosol – Geranium hydrosol is good for all skin types but particularly aging skin. It’s soothing, anti-inflammatory, and balancing.

Foaming Face Wash with Essential Oils

The beauty of a DIY face wash (pun intended!) is that you can swap out ingredients depending on specific skin conditions for a completely customized face wash. In a hydrosol the essential oils are diluted to about 2%, and the dilutions should be kept to 1-5% to avoid skin irritation. Keep this in mind if substitutions are being made.

A note on castile soap in recipes … different brands have different consistencies, so the amounts may need adjusting. The Dr. Bronners brand of castile soap is very thick, while some other brands are less so. Try reducing the hydrosol (or distilled water in the budget version) by half if the soap seems runny.

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